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View Full Version : Google WeVideo allows video editors to collaborate thru the Internet!



TomH1138
05-02-2012, 10:28 PM
I just saw this on another forum. I haven't tried it yet, but it looks pretty amazing.

Google will host your video on an Internet "cloud," and you can work on your edit with people in another town or state (or possibly even another country).

Can you imagine what this tool will do for fan editing - the possibilities that it opens up for collaborations?

My brain is just exploding with the possibilities at this moment! :)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcLErv-Oauo&feature=player_embedded

tranzor
05-02-2012, 10:31 PM
I can actually see "them" using this tool to spy on people to see exactly what they are doing and if it violates some sort of copyright. Would just make it easier for them to find you

Neglify
05-03-2012, 03:01 AM
I can actually see "them" using this tool to spy on people to see exactly what they are doing and if it violates some sort of copyright. Would just make it easier for them to find you

Good point Captain Buzzkill.


:-P

Delpheas
05-03-2012, 10:36 AM
I haven't looked at it yet, but I can't imagine them not allowing you to make your videos private and only viewable by those with a direct link.

tranzor
05-04-2012, 01:30 AM
I haven't looked at it yet, but I can't imagine them not allowing you to make your videos private and only viewable by those with a direct link.

you mean like here?:shock:

theslime
05-04-2012, 07:15 AM
I love this development. This is another step in Google's plans to make the browser the hub of everything that happens on a computer. The first ChromeBooks came out too early to be truly useful, but with the upgraded Google Drive and prosumer-quality image editing webapps, the future of most things desktop will be web. If the Google Play Store takes off, streaming movie rentals can take place through a HTML5 browser.

Of course, Google makes this to make money from the web and to make Chrome OS truly useful (one key criticism against a ChromeBook was the utter lack of video editing apps) so they can eat into Microsoft's and Apple's duopoly on desktop OS'es, but they're making the web a better and more useful place in the process.

Also, I think another of Google's reasons for doing this is making people buy extra Google Drive storage space. It's hard to collaborate on video projects on a 5 gigabyte quota. I'm fine with this. If a service is good enough, I don't have a problem with giving the creator some cash.

Are there privacy concerns? Sure. Still, even if it's a cloud-based storage service, your files are "private". It's not YouTube, so I think fanedits would be safe. (I haven't read the EULA of Drive properly, though.)

Still, I can't help feeling that with this (and other related developments, like Google Drive in general and the new version of Chrome OS) Google is raising the bar on web services, and it's up to the rest if they want to follow.

TomH1138
05-04-2012, 10:19 AM
Wow. I hadn't thought of all of those points. That's a very well articulated piece that covers all sides of the issue, theslime. Well said! :)

booshman
05-06-2012, 01:50 AM
So you have to use Google's built in editor to edit your files? I would have though it will be pretty basic and probably not the best tool to be fanediting with.

reave
05-06-2012, 03:20 PM
There was another cloud editor out a few months back that seemed like it was better quality. I'll stick to my hard drives, thanks.

TomH1138
05-06-2012, 06:55 PM
Which cloud editor was that, reave?

(I've been trying a few things with WeVideo now, and I have to say I'm not impressed at all.)

theslime
05-07-2012, 05:43 AM
It's a start, people. No one should be expecting miracles from a cloud/browser-based collaborative video editing, at least not yet. This will mainly compete with iMovie and Windows Movie Maker. And honestly, it probably won't take a lot of development to get to their level. It might be better than WMM already, for all I know. The fact is that up until, well, 2012 a true cloud and browser based collaborative NLE seemed like science fiction. Now it's here, so I'm not surprised it's not a Vegas replacement.


So you have to use Google's built in editor to edit your files?
That is kinda, well, the point. I guess you could try storing your project files on Google Drive and use Vegas instead, but it wouldn't be possible to do actual real-time collaboration, which is what this project is all about.

TomH1138
05-07-2012, 09:52 AM
It's a start, people. No one should be expecting miracles from a cloud/browser-based collaborative video editing, at least not yet.

All good points.

I was mainly annoyed that I can't delete something I put up there. I added a video file that's showing all subtitles. Since there's such limited space, I tried to get rid of it for a different format of the same video, which hopefully wouldn't have the subtitles in it. I right-clicked on the file. No options for deleting. I looked at the top menu. No options for deleting.

I looked at the Help menu. I have to log in to the wevideo.com site just in order to do one deletion. I tried logging in with my Google password, but it doesn't work. So it seems that I have to create a new account just for this site - all to make one deletion, an operation that should be so simple that even my Ulead can do it without all this silly runaround.

Ironically, Google has its good reputation in everything else it's done for being the most user-friendly and for being the most compatible with every other program. I guess they still have to work out a few bugs on this one.

theslime
05-07-2012, 10:30 AM
I didn't mean to sound like a fanboy. If it sucks, it sucks. Google has a history of releasing beta products, for better or for worse. Also, the more I look into it, the more it seems WeVideo isn't actually a Google product - it's a product that uses Google Drive as its data collaboration backend and Chrome as a frontend. Obviously it's a partnership, but WeVideo is a separate entity, I believe. That might also be the reason your Google password didn't work. I guess you'll have to register for WeVideo too.

TomH1138
05-07-2012, 08:37 PM
A third party, huh? That's good to know, and it makes a lot more sense that I have to re-register. Thanks for the heads-up!

booshman
05-08-2012, 02:13 AM
That is kinda, well, the point. I guess you could try storing your project files on Google Drive and use Vegas instead, but it wouldn't be possible to do actual real-time collaboration, which is what this project is all about.

I thought sharing project files was what this was all about. Storing the files online to be edited by multiple collaborators in a Premiere/ Vegas would be great if it worked smoothly. How is it possible to do real-time collaboration wevideo? How could you have more than one person editing the same project at the same time? I would have thought that any editing collaboration would be taken in turns by the editors, that being the case, why bother with wevideo.

theslime
05-08-2012, 06:42 AM
You could share project files in a trillion different ways already, Dropbox, SpiderOak, Wuala, SkyDrive, etc. WeVideo attempts (badly, it seems, at least for the time being) to take this one step further and feature something closer to realtime collaboration.

TomH1138
05-08-2012, 08:54 AM
I thought sharing project files was what this was all about. Storing the files online to be edited by multiple collaborators in a Premiere/ Vegas would be great if it worked smoothly. How is it possible to do real-time collaboration wevideo? How could you have more than one person editing the same project at the same time? I would have thought that any editing collaboration would be taken in turns by the editors, that being the case, why bother with wevideo.

I don't think any video editor, ever, anywhere, could allow people to edit at the same time. You could be making different changes to the same parts unintentionally! :-) But rather than re-uploading and sending a new file to someone every time you change 30 seconds of the product, the file is always up there already on the site. And you don't have to worry about not having the same kind of editing software as the other person.

At least, that's the ideal. Maybe when WeVideo gets some of the kinks worked out, that's what it will be.

L8wrtr
05-08-2012, 01:01 PM
It would more likely act as a content system and manipulation platform. Like programming a module of code, someone on the team would likely check out parts to work on. During such time that portion would be locked out, preventing others from making changes. Also, to be workable this thing would need dynamic ability to save a ton of versions due to the collaborative dynamic that they are seeking to create.

It may not be a system that works for everyone or every situation, but over time this has a lot of potential in terms of furthering the general mentality of moving away from local terminals with brains and replicated software etc to a more centralized use of resource. I'm not saying that this is a good thing, or a bad thing as there are pluses and minuses, but there is no denying that technology is moving away from the stand-alone model to a satellite model.

What I do like is that this implies a shift towards in handling media in terms that the younger generation wants, access to their resources online, from anywhere, via multiple connection platforms (PC, Tablet etc), but that includes a shift in the media itself. If anything I see this as helping shift the paradigm (yes, I used the P word) of media corporations away their outdated distribution model.

Donald Munson Jr
05-21-2012, 11:56 PM
It would be fun to do something with a movie like they did with star wars uncut, only without re-shooting anything, only individuals would re-edit whole scenes timed pretty much the same, and then someone could stitch them altogether where they go. How it would look, who knows, but I would say leave it completely open to use any footage from any of the films.

Eh, maybe its too convoluted.:shock: