Database Fanedit Listings FanMix Matrix 2.0, The: Battle for Zion

Matrix 2.0, The: Battle for Zion http://www.fanedit.org/ifdb/media/reviews/photos/thumbnail/300x300s/76/10/25/210_battleforzion-front-134298787850.jpg

June 28, 2012    
 
8.0 (7)
2229   0   1   0  
 
Faneditor Name:
Franchise:
Fanedit Type:
Original Release Date:
2003
Original Running Time:
138 + 129
Fanedit Release Date:
Fanedit Running Time:
107
Time Cut:
160

Brief Synopsis:
To save Zion, Neo must save the Machines from a virulent Agent taking over the Matrix from within. But the path of the One is shadowed and perilous and even the Oracle cannot see the end.
All Neo knows is that this quest may claim his life.
Will the One face his destiny?
Or will Zion fall?
Intention:
To create a sequel worthy of the first movie: intense action, interesting and unique characters, and discussions as to the nature of existence.

I thought about (and discussed) often the flaws in the sequels – where they went so wrong, and how. A glimmer of a silver thread of a story started to emerge: one where the “look at us, we’re so clever” stuff was dropped, but the essential questions of life were raised: choice, free will, predestination, salvation. Battle for Zion is that story.
Additional Notes:
Note: This edit was originally released in October 2010 and redone and re-released in July 2012.
Special Thanks:
Essential to the final product was the community here at fanedit.org. Without you guys this movie would not have been anywhere near as good as it is. A special shout-out to STANKPAC who used many hours previewing on the film and commenting and suggesting cool solutions.

Many thanks man!

AEmovieguy deserves a special mention for the most EPIC FEEDBACK post ever given! Awesome job – your post was largely the inspiration for Battle for Zion.

Nightstalkerpoet, havok1977 and eldiablosuizo were also previewing guinea pigs who set aside time to watch and comment. Thanks guys – your comments were most helpful.

Also bluejayone for his help and everyone else – THANKS!
Release Information
NTSC DVD-9
Editing Details:
Dangermouse presents

The sequel we should have had.

By skillfully merging Reloaded and the convoluted and boring Revolutions into a brand new epic story, Dangermouse redeems the sequels while remaining true to the spirit of the Matrix universe.

Enter a world where choices matter, where people fight for truth, and where Zion is worth dying for.

Choice vs. Causality.
Yin vs. Yang.
Virus vs. Anti-virus.
Andersen vs. Neo.

To save Zion, Neo must save the Machines from a virulent Agent taking over the Matrix from within. But the path of the One is shadowed and perilous and even the Oracle cannot see the end. All Neo knows is that this quest may claim his life. Will the One face his destiny? Or will Zion fall?

Destiny awaits.

Enter the Matrix.
And free your mind.
Again.
Cuts and Additions:

Cut list:

It’s a totally new film. The guts of 2 and 3 were ripped out and then put back together!

But, the first half plays roughly like a slim version of Reloaded – after that Reloaded and Revolution merge in the race to the Source to parley peace while Smith takes over the Matrix, and the Hammer races back to Zion to delay the Machines utterly destroying it.
Cover art by Dangermouse (DOWNLOAD HERE)
image

Original Cover art by Rogue-theX (DOWNLOAD HERE)
image

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Average user rating from: 7 user(s)

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Overall rating 
 
8.0
Audio/Video Quality 
 
9.0  (2)
Visual Editing 
 
8.0  (2)
Audio Editing 
 
7.5  (2)
Narrative 
 
7.5  (2)
Enjoyment 
 
8.0  (7)
This is the 2nd best edit of The Matrix sequels that I've seen. The location marker's, while somewhat useful, I felt are unnecessary and distracting so I put some cardboard in front of my moniter to cover them up and was able to enjoy the movie. At least the first half which was great, jump right in the matrix with sweet fight scene one after another. Then after the Morpheus fight on the semi-truck we enter the depressing tunnels of the real world and I lost a lot of interest. Possibly because of the location marker's missing but to me it felt like the exciting scenes were mostly gone and back to the depression of the the real world of the matrix. So to build comment on the previous review, this edit wasn't "ruthlessly shortened". . to me it "wasn't ruthlessly shortened enough."

The ending however was my cup of tea, cheers.
Overall rating 
 
7.6
Audio/Video Quality 
 
8.0
Visual Editing 
 
8.0
Audio Editing 
 
8.0
Narrative 
 
6.0
Enjoyment 
 
8.0
Reviewed by ioangruffudd June 19, 2014
View all my reviews (1)

This is the 2nd best edit of The Matrix sequels that I've seen. The location marker's, while somewhat useful, I felt are unnecessary and distracting so I put some cardboard in front of my moniter to cover them up and was able to enjoy the movie. At least the first half which was great, jump right in the matrix with sweet fight scene one after another. Then after the Morpheus fight on the semi-truck we enter the depressing tunnels of the real world and I lost a lot of interest. Possibly because of the location marker's missing but to me it felt like the exciting scenes were mostly gone and back to the depression of the the real world of the matrix. So to build comment on the previous review, this edit wasn't "ruthlessly shortened". . to me it "wasn't ruthlessly shortened enough."

The ending however was my cup of tea, cheers.

User Review

Do you recommend this edit?
Yes
Format Watched?
DVD
Faneditor's Reply

Thanks for the kind review. Glad you enjoyed it.
I agree with you about the location markers - but many people struggled to follow the narrative without them!
And the real world is depressing. And Zion was so insipid in the sequels - I tried to cut out as much as possible- rather hint at Zion than show it in all its mud brown "glory"!

Was this review helpful to you? 
I don't hate the Matrix sequels, but I've always found them terribly disappointing as a follow-up to the brilliance that was the original film. They are full of great ideas that get in the way of one another, weak philosophical rambling, and action scenes that occur too often and go on for two long. Ultimately, they lack focus. What Dangermouse has done here is return that much-needed focus to the two films by hacking them to pieces, picking out the most essential chunks, and suturing these back together in a new way. What we get as a result is so much more satisfying, so much closer to what we expected from a sequel to The Matrix, that I don't even mind losing the long stretches of the original two films that disappointed me in the first place. For the first time ever watching any version of these movies, I didn't get bored once. Make no mistake, it all plays out very differently than it did in theaters, but I, for one, had zero problems with that. Even though I was a little annoyed by the frequency of the location markers at first (It's often clear by the skillful cutting where the next scene takes place), as the narrative became more confusing toward the end, when everyone has their own separate mission, I was thankful that they were there. I still think a few of them are unnecessary, but maybe that's just me. Also worth noting, this may be a ruthlessly shortened cut of the Matrix sequels, but Dangermouse has taken great care to preserve little character beats and jokes that, while not necessarily essential to the plot, ARE essential for making our heroes relatable. At the same time, he did cut out these same beats that do not feel genuine ("I had a dream, but now that dream is gone from me"). If you're not sure what I'm getting at, think about the way the characters were written in the two Star Wars trilogies. Which ones did you care about more?

And now for the constructive criticism...
While the first half of the film is edited wonderfully (the burly brawl especially was perfect), with the cuts feeling logical and everything flowing naturally from one scene to the next, the second half is a little too frenetic. Some of these scenes need time to breathe, or they ought to have been excised completely. I understand that many of these sequences are happening at the same time, and since it's the climax of the film the rhythm of the cutting should be fast, but if we are given a new location marker, we need to spend more than a few seconds there to digest what's happening before moving on to the next one. Even a couple of inessential lines of dialogue would be enough sometimes to ease the whiplash. As a rule, I think the sound edits could be hidden better; there aren't many horrible cuts, but they are frequently noticeable, even outside of the obvious music changes. Overlapping a bit of sound between scenes with drastically different aural compositions would help immensely. Also, even though I like what you did with the overlay of Neo's voice when he tells the architect about Smith quite a bit, his voice is so much louder than the rest of the dialogue in the movie that it's rather distracting when it happens. And lastly, the ending is very abrupt. I'm completely okay with the change, but I think it could have played out better. We need a little more catharsis for Zion, and the rhythm of the last shots of Trinity and Neo are pretty awkward. Everything else I can forgive as a result of drastic cutting.

There were a lot of other specific things about this edit that I love and a couple of niggles that I didn't mention because other reviewers here have covered them already. So if you're still on the fence about watching this, read those too. As for me, I heartily recommend Matrix 2.0.
Overall rating 
 
8.3
Audio/Video Quality 
 
10.0
Visual Editing 
 
8.0
Audio Editing 
 
7.0
Narrative 
 
9.0
Enjoyment 
 
8.0
Reviewed by plurmonger March 22, 2013
Top 100 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (22)

I don't hate the Matrix sequels, but I've always found them terribly disappointing as a follow-up to the brilliance that was the original film. They are full of great ideas that get in the way of one another, weak philosophical rambling, and action scenes that occur too often and go on for two long. Ultimately, they lack focus. What Dangermouse has done here is return that much-needed focus to the two films by hacking them to pieces, picking out the most essential chunks, and suturing these back together in a new way. What we get as a result is so much more satisfying, so much closer to what we expected from a sequel to The Matrix, that I don't even mind losing the long stretches of the original two films that disappointed me in the first place. For the first time ever watching any version of these movies, I didn't get bored once. Make no mistake, it all plays out very differently than it did in theaters, but I, for one, had zero problems with that. Even though I was a little annoyed by the frequency of the location markers at first (It's often clear by the skillful cutting where the next scene takes place), as the narrative became more confusing toward the end, when everyone has their own separate mission, I was thankful that they were there. I still think a few of them are unnecessary, but maybe that's just me. Also worth noting, this may be a ruthlessly shortened cut of the Matrix sequels, but Dangermouse has taken great care to preserve little character beats and jokes that, while not necessarily essential to the plot, ARE essential for making our heroes relatable. At the same time, he did cut out these same beats that do not feel genuine ("I had a dream, but now that dream is gone from me"). If you're not sure what I'm getting at, think about the way the characters were written in the two Star Wars trilogies. Which ones did you care about more?

And now for the constructive criticism...
While the first half of the film is edited wonderfully (the burly brawl especially was perfect), with the cuts feeling logical and everything flowing naturally from one scene to the next, the second half is a little too frenetic. Some of these scenes need time to breathe, or they ought to have been excised completely. I understand that many of these sequences are happening at the same time, and since it's the climax of the film the rhythm of the cutting should be fast, but if we are given a new location marker, we need to spend more than a few seconds there to digest what's happening before moving on to the next one. Even a couple of inessential lines of dialogue would be enough sometimes to ease the whiplash. As a rule, I think the sound edits could be hidden better; there aren't many horrible cuts, but they are frequently noticeable, even outside of the obvious music changes. Overlapping a bit of sound between scenes with drastically different aural compositions would help immensely. Also, even though I like what you did with the overlay of Neo's voice when he tells the architect about Smith quite a bit, his voice is so much louder than the rest of the dialogue in the movie that it's rather distracting when it happens. And lastly, the ending is very abrupt. I'm completely okay with the change, but I think it could have played out better. We need a little more catharsis for Zion, and the rhythm of the last shots of Trinity and Neo are pretty awkward. Everything else I can forgive as a result of drastic cutting.

There were a lot of other specific things about this edit that I love and a couple of niggles that I didn't mention because other reviewers here have covered them already. So if you're still on the fence about watching this, read those too. As for me, I heartily recommend Matrix 2.0.

User Review

Do you recommend this edit?
Yes
Format Watched?
DVD
Faneditor's Reply

Thank you plurmonger.
Oh, if I could have gone and filmed some pick-up shots....! The second half IS a bit too choppy, but there's just no footage to work from. :-(
I think one day I might revisit this in HD, and I'll definitely consider if any scenes can be excised or perhaps strung together to make them longer and easier to follow.
And yes I did struggle with the audio - it was a bastard to get ok, never mind good. And, yes, I think I overdid it with Neo's voice - although on some systems it sounds perfect, others way too loud.
Thanks for the constructive criticism. Appreciate it.

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Battle for Zion is a really interesting effort to combine the two Matrix sequel films in a new context, and I felt that some decisions were strokes of genius while others exposed that the two original stories actually had more plot than I realized, making them diverge more (and combine less effectively) as this edit progressed.

SPOILERS FOR THIS EDIT FOLLOW.

First, I should say that I’m relatively new to Fanedit and this is the first Matrix edit I’ve seen (and that means that I don’t know whether or not any editing decisions here have been made in others), but the concept of making a totally new film out of the guts of the two existing sequels really fascinated me, and the way Dangermouse pulled it off led to some really brilliant CHANGES to the story, entirely repurposing some scenes for use in a new way. Some scenes were used like that to create “shortcuts” that helped excise subplots, and these were the parts I enjoyed the most, for their ingenuity.
One of these is the decision to make the encounter with the Architect into a significant end goal. There’s no need to visit the elaborate machine mainframe environment, because we can visit the Architect at that point instead and it serves the same purpose! And the removal of the Trinity-death subplot means that Neo’s motivations change significantly, because his recurring visions of HIS OWN death from the end of Revolutions (in place of the visions of Trinity’s death) give him a totally different kind of internal conflict. When he says he doesn’t know what he’s supposed to do and is reluctant to open up to Trinity, it’s for different reasons – he knows he’s going to die if he chooses to face Smith. In his discussion with the Architect, he finds the courage to open the door anyway, returning from there to face Smith in the matrix, even though he already knows the end result – he’s doing it because he wants to make a choice. I’d say “choice” is what this edit really boils down to and emphasizes far more than the original films, and it’s where this really shines – the Architect makes it clear that the problem is human choice – it’s something that the machines can’t wrap their brains around. So, it works extremely well when immediately after this discussion Neo returns to face Smith, because after being beaten he continues to struggle and attempt to fight, and when Smith asks him why, Neo says it’s because he chooses to. This is all thematically rock solid, and I really applaud Dangermouse for this combined sequence. There are a number of great things like this that refocus the story on something new, and give the remaining action sequences more meaning. I also really liked that the real-world-Smith character was entirely removed – a fantastic idea.

However, there are parts that I think don’t work very well at all. I can’t really nitpick about some of the hard cuts that come late in the story because they simply have to be there – the stories of the two films have diverged so much by that point that putting them together is going to mean an awful lot of jumping around. Too much, really. At the end, there are like 6 different locations with simultaneous events – so many that Dangermouse has to have a constant “location” identifier text message appear at the start of each scene, telling us where we are now and what certain groups of characters are doing, and how long it is until a certain event will occur that was mentioned earlier. If I look at this edit alone and try to forget the original films, that process just doesn’t work well; if there needs to be a message to tell us what characters are doing in each scene, the movie itself isn’t doing a good enough job at communication. Without those messages I would have been utterly lost, which makes me think there must have been a way to streamline things a bit more. There are just way too many characters at the end, characters from both films. Perhaps somehow removing some of these characters entirely would have helped, or making it so some things happen in sequence instead of simultaneously. Other reviews here are saying a solution might be to cut LESS – but since the story this edit is telling is basically something new, I might even cut MORE – whatever it takes to focus in even tighter on the characters and storylines that really matter here, if just so we don’t need that text. Some of the subplots that were kept in really only seemed to be there to show how a character got from one place to another. I’m not sure how an issue like that could be resolved with the available footage, but there it is.
Another issue I had was the ending, which, for me, hurt the edit – it felt blatant and out-of-place. I don’t know how it could have been done better, given that both Neo and Trinity survived – but perhaps leaving things a bit more ambiguous could have helped. If not, I like tylerdurden’s idea of maybe just using the entire rave sequence as the ending so it’d feel a bit more substantial – but I still respect and appreciate the decision that was made.

END SPOILERS.

Conclusion: I have to say, I definitely couldn’t just show someone this edit and call it a standalone sequel to The Matrix, because while it does conclude that story within a single movie, everything just gets so fractured and dizzying that the plot progression has to pretty much be held together by text notifications as it moves along.
However, as an exercise in editing, The Matrix 2.0: Battle for Zion is a great success. I will recommend this edit specifically to those who are already very familiar with Reloaded and Revolutions, because once you see how everything has been repurposed and reorganized, you will really appreciate exactly what Dangermouse has done to establish totally different motivations and arcs for characters. It’s evident that this was really a tough thing to do and it’s a lot of fun to see the results.

7/10
Overall rating 
 
7.0
Audio/Video Quality 
 
N/A
Visual Editing 
 
N/A
Audio Editing 
 
N/A
Narrative 
 
N/A
Enjoyment 
 
7.0
Reviewed by antipode August 21, 2012
Top 1000 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (1)

Battle for Zion is a really interesting effort to combine the two Matrix sequel films in a new context, and I felt that some decisions were strokes of genius while others exposed that the two original stories actually had more plot than I realized, making them diverge more (and combine less effectively) as this edit progressed.

SPOILERS FOR THIS EDIT FOLLOW.

First, I should say that I’m relatively new to Fanedit and this is the first Matrix edit I’ve seen (and that means that I don’t know whether or not any editing decisions here have been made in others), but the concept of making a totally new film out of the guts of the two existing sequels really fascinated me, and the way Dangermouse pulled it off led to some really brilliant CHANGES to the story, entirely repurposing some scenes for use in a new way. Some scenes were used like that to create “shortcuts” that helped excise subplots, and these were the parts I enjoyed the most, for their ingenuity.
One of these is the decision to make the encounter with the Architect into a significant end goal. There’s no need to visit the elaborate machine mainframe environment, because we can visit the Architect at that point instead and it serves the same purpose! And the removal of the Trinity-death subplot means that Neo’s motivations change significantly, because his recurring visions of HIS OWN death from the end of Revolutions (in place of the visions of Trinity’s death) give him a totally different kind of internal conflict. When he says he doesn’t know what he’s supposed to do and is reluctant to open up to Trinity, it’s for different reasons – he knows he’s going to die if he chooses to face Smith. In his discussion with the Architect, he finds the courage to open the door anyway, returning from there to face Smith in the matrix, even though he already knows the end result – he’s doing it because he wants to make a choice. I’d say “choice” is what this edit really boils down to and emphasizes far more than the original films, and it’s where this really shines – the Architect makes it clear that the problem is human choice – it’s something that the machines can’t wrap their brains around. So, it works extremely well when immediately after this discussion Neo returns to face Smith, because after being beaten he continues to struggle and attempt to fight, and when Smith asks him why, Neo says it’s because he chooses to. This is all thematically rock solid, and I really applaud Dangermouse for this combined sequence. There are a number of great things like this that refocus the story on something new, and give the remaining action sequences more meaning. I also really liked that the real-world-Smith character was entirely removed – a fantastic idea.

However, there are parts that I think don’t work very well at all. I can’t really nitpick about some of the hard cuts that come late in the story because they simply have to be there – the stories of the two films have diverged so much by that point that putting them together is going to mean an awful lot of jumping around. Too much, really. At the end, there are like 6 different locations with simultaneous events – so many that Dangermouse has to have a constant “location” identifier text message appear at the start of each scene, telling us where we are now and what certain groups of characters are doing, and how long it is until a certain event will occur that was mentioned earlier. If I look at this edit alone and try to forget the original films, that process just doesn’t work well; if there needs to be a message to tell us what characters are doing in each scene, the movie itself isn’t doing a good enough job at communication. Without those messages I would have been utterly lost, which makes me think there must have been a way to streamline things a bit more. There are just way too many characters at the end, characters from both films. Perhaps somehow removing some of these characters entirely would have helped, or making it so some things happen in sequence instead of simultaneously. Other reviews here are saying a solution might be to cut LESS – but since the story this edit is telling is basically something new, I might even cut MORE – whatever it takes to focus in even tighter on the characters and storylines that really matter here, if just so we don’t need that text. Some of the subplots that were kept in really only seemed to be there to show how a character got from one place to another. I’m not sure how an issue like that could be resolved with the available footage, but there it is.
Another issue I had was the ending, which, for me, hurt the edit – it felt blatant and out-of-place. I don’t know how it could have been done better, given that both Neo and Trinity survived – but perhaps leaving things a bit more ambiguous could have helped. If not, I like tylerdurden’s idea of maybe just using the entire rave sequence as the ending so it’d feel a bit more substantial – but I still respect and appreciate the decision that was made.

END SPOILERS.

Conclusion: I have to say, I definitely couldn’t just show someone this edit and call it a standalone sequel to The Matrix, because while it does conclude that story within a single movie, everything just gets so fractured and dizzying that the plot progression has to pretty much be held together by text notifications as it moves along.
However, as an exercise in editing, The Matrix 2.0: Battle for Zion is a great success. I will recommend this edit specifically to those who are already very familiar with Reloaded and Revolutions, because once you see how everything has been repurposed and reorganized, you will really appreciate exactly what Dangermouse has done to establish totally different motivations and arcs for characters. It’s evident that this was really a tough thing to do and it’s a lot of fun to see the results.

7/10

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Just finished watching it. First let me say ‘you did it’. You made a Matrix sequels fan edit the way I had always wanted to see it. A while back, after having watched all of the other Matrix sequels fan edits, I had planned on making one that combines both into one film, and most importantly moves the fight against the machines in the real world to the same time in the story as the end of Reloaded. So for doing that, I say ‘thank you’.

My first impression when I started watching this was “Wow, BOTH films condensed into only an hour and 47 minutes? Impossible!!” But, you proved me wrong, for the most part. If anything, my only suggestion to improve this fan edit is that I feel the narrative should be fleshed out a little more. I like how everything you did changes the plot, but I feel like I’m watching an edited for tv version that condenses it down for time. What I mean is, it feels rushed and over-edited. To me this edit would be perfect if you added back in roughly 30 minutes of footage, making the run-time 2 hours 15 minutes. Granted, I’m NOT saying I want you to add back in characterization for characters that don’t need it (like Link, his wife, the kid, the general, or the little girl and her family), but I feel that we should’ve had a little more just to give us a better idea of who some of these characters are (like Lock and Niobe). A little bit more of Smith never hurts either, but I do like how the first time we see him use his “duplicating powers” is on the agent, and DEFINITELY prefer seeing him do that to Neo only once at the end. Adding back in a little bit would also help with the ending, which is very feel good and uplifting. I would’ve used the dance party scene as a way to show Zion celebrating their victory, but I wonder if you cut that out because you didn’t care for the scene.

Also, I would’ve liked to see more of the fight/battle scenes (though you edited them better than all the other Reloaded/Revolutions edits. Remember, I’ve seen them all. None of them ever edited the fight scenes right, mostly due to the music). However, I understand that since we’re seeing this all in one movie, pacing is important and too much of the fighting scenes can be overkill. Though one scene in particular that I wish you hadn’t edited so much was the chase scene in Revolutions when Niobe is outrunning the sentinels, as I felt it was the funnest scene in the theatrical version. The other captain’s line of “I had no idea this ship could do that” makes me laugh every time. I can tell you don’t care for CGI Neo and Smith during the first Burly Brawl. That’s why we only see a little bit of them in CGI at the end of the scene, correct?

No reason for me to go into detail about these points, but I’m glad your edit doesn’t have any sub-plots of Neo having power outside of the Matrix, no sub plot of there being other “ones”, no sub plot of system shut down and resetting the Matrix, no Neo premonitions of the future, no dude who is Smith in the real world, no train station guy, no Trinity deaths, no council elder talking to Neo with his pseudo-psychology 101 rhetoric, no time wasted on characters that appear out of nowhere (and/or add nothing to the plot), and not much of the little girl and none of her family. In fact to me, in your edit it seems more like she will be the next Oracle, and not the next “one”. Which works better IMO.

Ok, onto my nitpicks. I didn’t like the Oracle’s sudden change in appearance or Neo’s outfit, but that can’t be helped. The edit of Sariph and Neo switching places in the small house (since they don’t fight) kinda threw me off. Lastly, I personally didn’t care for the opening 5 minute flashback. Everyone has seen the first film, so we all know what’s going on. It was edited perfectly though.

Anyway, for now the “Hacked” edits are my “go to” edits when I’m in the mood for some Matrix, but you’ve laid the groundwork for that changing. Consider some of my ideas and your edit will de-throne them from my collection. However, do not let this deter you, as after the “Hacked” edits, yours is WITHOUT A DOUBT the next best edit (and very close to being better than them). Remember, I’ve seen all the edits so I know which ones are good. When I planned on making my own edit of these films I re-watched ALL the fan edits of the Matrix sequels and took notes of each of what I liked and disliked about each one so that my edit would be perfect. You’ve basically done it for me. And that really, really means a lot.

As for a rating: 9 out of 10.
Overall rating 
 
9.0
Audio/Video Quality 
 
N/A
Visual Editing 
 
N/A
Audio Editing 
 
N/A
Narrative 
 
N/A
Enjoyment 
 
9.0
Reviewed by tylerdurden389 August 19, 2012
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (13)

Just finished watching it. First let me say ‘you did it’. You made a Matrix sequels fan edit the way I had always wanted to see it. A while back, after having watched all of the other Matrix sequels fan edits, I had planned on making one that combines both into one film, and most importantly moves the fight against the machines in the real world to the same time in the story as the end of Reloaded. So for doing that, I say ‘thank you’.

My first impression when I started watching this was “Wow, BOTH films condensed into only an hour and 47 minutes? Impossible!!” But, you proved me wrong, for the most part. If anything, my only suggestion to improve this fan edit is that I feel the narrative should be fleshed out a little more. I like how everything you did changes the plot, but I feel like I’m watching an edited for tv version that condenses it down for time. What I mean is, it feels rushed and over-edited. To me this edit would be perfect if you added back in roughly 30 minutes of footage, making the run-time 2 hours 15 minutes. Granted, I’m NOT saying I want you to add back in characterization for characters that don’t need it (like Link, his wife, the kid, the general, or the little girl and her family), but I feel that we should’ve had a little more just to give us a better idea of who some of these characters are (like Lock and Niobe). A little bit more of Smith never hurts either, but I do like how the first time we see him use his “duplicating powers” is on the agent, and DEFINITELY prefer seeing him do that to Neo only once at the end. Adding back in a little bit would also help with the ending, which is very feel good and uplifting. I would’ve used the dance party scene as a way to show Zion celebrating their victory, but I wonder if you cut that out because you didn’t care for the scene.

Also, I would’ve liked to see more of the fight/battle scenes (though you edited them better than all the other Reloaded/Revolutions edits. Remember, I’ve seen them all. None of them ever edited the fight scenes right, mostly due to the music). However, I understand that since we’re seeing this all in one movie, pacing is important and too much of the fighting scenes can be overkill. Though one scene in particular that I wish you hadn’t edited so much was the chase scene in Revolutions when Niobe is outrunning the sentinels, as I felt it was the funnest scene in the theatrical version. The other captain’s line of “I had no idea this ship could do that” makes me laugh every time. I can tell you don’t care for CGI Neo and Smith during the first Burly Brawl. That’s why we only see a little bit of them in CGI at the end of the scene, correct?

No reason for me to go into detail about these points, but I’m glad your edit doesn’t have any sub-plots of Neo having power outside of the Matrix, no sub plot of there being other “ones”, no sub plot of system shut down and resetting the Matrix, no Neo premonitions of the future, no dude who is Smith in the real world, no train station guy, no Trinity deaths, no council elder talking to Neo with his pseudo-psychology 101 rhetoric, no time wasted on characters that appear out of nowhere (and/or add nothing to the plot), and not much of the little girl and none of her family. In fact to me, in your edit it seems more like she will be the next Oracle, and not the next “one”. Which works better IMO.

Ok, onto my nitpicks. I didn’t like the Oracle’s sudden change in appearance or Neo’s outfit, but that can’t be helped. The edit of Sariph and Neo switching places in the small house (since they don’t fight) kinda threw me off. Lastly, I personally didn’t care for the opening 5 minute flashback. Everyone has seen the first film, so we all know what’s going on. It was edited perfectly though.

Anyway, for now the “Hacked” edits are my “go to” edits when I’m in the mood for some Matrix, but you’ve laid the groundwork for that changing. Consider some of my ideas and your edit will de-throne them from my collection. However, do not let this deter you, as after the “Hacked” edits, yours is WITHOUT A DOUBT the next best edit (and very close to being better than them). Remember, I’ve seen all the edits so I know which ones are good. When I planned on making my own edit of these films I re-watched ALL the fan edits of the Matrix sequels and took notes of each of what I liked and disliked about each one so that my edit would be perfect. You’ve basically done it for me. And that really, really means a lot.

As for a rating: 9 out of 10.

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9.0
Reviewed by steelio2006 June 01, 2011
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (62)

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